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Event Handler - advanced

Custom reply message type

In an eventhandler, you can specify custom reply message types to be returned instead of the default ack() or validationAck() functions. These custom replies give you more flexibility.

Let us look at an example. This is based on a table called TRADE with a primary key of TRADE_ID and at least two fields: PRICE and QUANTITY. Here is an example of a custom message reply type called CustomTradeEventReply:

sealed class CustomTradeEventReply : Outbound() {
class TradeEventValidateAck : CustomTradeEventReply()
data class TradeEventAck(val tradeId: String, val message: String) : CustomTradeEventReply()
data class TradeEventNack(val error: String) : CustomTradeEventReply()
}

So how would we use that in an eventHandler codeblock?

  1. Add the example to the file {app-name}-messages and assemble.
  2. Once you have built, add api(project("{app-name}-messages")) to your build.gradle.kts file under {app-name}-script-config/build.gradle.kts.

You can now use the following example eventHandler:

If you have built your tables correctly, IntelliJ will be able to find Trade. If not, go back and check the fields in your tables.

    eventHandler<Trade, CustomTradeEventReply>(name = "CUSTOM_TRADE_EVENT") {
onException { event, throwable ->
CustomTradeEventReply.TradeEventNack(throwable.message!!)
}
onValidate {
val tradeEvent = it.details
val notional = tradeEvent.price?.times(tradeEvent.quantity!!.toDouble())

require(notional!! < 1_000_000) { "Trade notional is too high" }
CustomTradeEventReply.TradeEventValidateAck()
}
onCommit { event ->
val trade = event.details
val result = entityDb.insert(trade)
CustomTradeEventReply.TradeEventAck(result.record.tradeId, "Trade inserted")
}
}

Let's look at some detail on those codeblocks.

onValidate

For custom reply messages, the 'onValidate' codeblock is mandatory.

Remember - custom replies do not use the default ack() or validationAck() functions.

Server response

The response from the server is different for custom reply messages, so the client side of your application needs to be aware of that. Each field you define in your custom request reply is included in the json response. In our example, we specified two fields to be returned in a TradeEventAck(): tradeId and message.

{
"GENERATED": [],
"TRADE_ID": "1",
"MESSAGE": "Trade inserted",
"MESSAGE_TYPE": "TRADE_EVENT_ACK",
"SOURCE_REF": "****",
"METADATA": {
"IS_EMPTY": true,
"ALL": {}
}
}

By comparison, an ack() in a standard (non-custom) eventhandler generates a response from the server that looks like this:

{
"GENERATED": [],
"MESSAGE_TYPE": "EVENT_ACK",
"SOURCE_REF": "****",
"METADATA": {
"IS_EMPTY": true,
"ALL": {}
}
}

onException

The onException block can capture any exceptions thrown by the onValidate and onCommit blocks and returns the expected reply message type (as shown in the last example). This function is particularly useful if you are using a custom message type; by default, Event Handlers will attempt to translate exceptions automatically to an EventNack message, which might cause compatibility problems if you are using custom replies.

Permissioning and permissionCodes

As with other GPAL files (e.g. Request Server and Data Server), you can use a permissioning block to define both dynamic permissions (AUTH) and fixed permissions (based on RIGHT_SUMMARY rights) on Event Handlers.

Dynamic permissions

For Event Handlers you need to use any class as event message type instead of table/view, which is similar to custom request-replies. In the below example we use a generated database entity called Company as message type of event EVENT_AUTH_COMPANY_INSERT

    eventHandler<Company>(name = "AUTH_COMPANY_INSERT") {
permissioning {
auth(mapName = "COMPANY"){
field { companyName }
}
}

onCommit { event ->
val company = event.details
val result = entityDb.insert(company)
ack(listOf(mapOf("VALUE" to result.record.companyId)))
}
}

If you use custom class instead of generated database entities as message-type of events, we recommend that you locate your classes within the messages module of your application. This is where we place all the custom message types for our application. You need to ensure that the app-name-script-config module has a dependency on the messages module.

    api(project(":&#123;app-name}-messages"))

Permission codes

    eventHandler<Company>(name = "AUTH_COMPANY_INSERT") {
permissionCodes = listOf("INSERT_TRADE")
onCommit { event ->
val company = event.details
val result = entityDb.insert(company)
ack(listOf(mapOf("VALUE" to result.record.companyId)))
}
}

You can find out more details in our section on authorisation.

Auto auditing

If the Event Handler message type is a database-generated entity that is auditable, Genesis automatically creates an audit record to the corresponding audit table for each database write operation. The audit fields are filled with the following values:

  • AUDIT_EVENT_TYPE: Event name
  • AUDIT_EVENT_DATETIME: Autogenerated
  • AUDIT_EVENT_TEXT: Optional “REASON” value sent as part of the event message
  • AUDIT_EVENT_USER: Extracted from the event message

To guarantee that the audit record is inserted into the audit table, Genesis provides a parameter to eventhandler blocks: transactional = true | false.

Transactional eventhandlers are ACID-compliant, which means that they use concept of transactions to guarantee that the audit record is inserted into the audit table. In other words, if transactional = true and the eventHandler triggered finishes its excecution, then it is guaranteed that the audit record is inserted.

warning

Make sure your database supports transactions.

Auto auditing for Java Event Handlers

The advantage of using Kotlin is that you can set up automatic auditing with a single line of code. However, if you are working in Java, then you need to use RxEntityDb to interact with the database, and automatic auditing is not available.

You can solve this by setting up a simple handler and using this in your eventHandler codeblock before you write to the table. This will provide your audited records when you insert, modify and delete on the table.

For example:

var auditEntityDb = db.audited(
userName,
eventType,
auditText
);
auditEntityDb.modify(trade).subscribe();

There is more information about using Java in our page on Java Event Handlers

Defining state machines

State machines, which define the conditions for moving from one state to another, are defined within your Event Handler files. See more details about these in the section on Defining your state machines.

Disabling schema validation

It is possible to disable the automatic JSON Schema validation enforced by default for all type-safe messages for each individual event handler.

To disable schema validation for a specific event, either:

  • Override the schemaValidation method to false in the custom Event Handler definitions. or
  • Set the schemaValidation property to false in a GPAL Event Handler.

Here is an example of a custom Event Handler definition:

import global.genesis.commons.annotation.Module
import global.genesis.eventhandler.typed.async.AsyncValidatingEventHandler
import global.genesis.message.core.event.Event
import global.genesis.message.core.event.EventReply

@Module
class TestCompanyHandlerAsync : AsyncValidatingEventHandler<Company, EventReply> {
// Override schemaValidation here to disable schema validation
override fun schemaValidation(): Boolean = false

override suspend fun onValidate(message: Event<Company>): EventReply {
val company = message.details
// custom code block..
return ack()
}

override suspend fun onCommit(message: Event<Company>): EventReply {
val company = message.details
// custom code block..
return ack()
}
}

or in a GPAL definition:


eventHandler {
eventHandler<Company> {
schemaValidation = false
onCommit { event ->
val company = event.details
// custom code block..
ack()
}
}
}

See more information about how to define type-safe messages here.

Pending approvals

The Genesis low-code platform has an in-built pending approval mechanism that can be used with Event Handlers. This is useful where particular events require a second user to approve them in order to take effect. Genesis Pending Approvals works with the concepts of “delayed” events and "4-eyes check".

Set an event to require approval

To enable the pending approval workflow for an Event Handler implementation, either:

  • Override the requiresPendingApproval method with an appropriate function in the custom Event Handler definitions.

or

  • Configure the requiresPendingApproval block in a GPAL Event Handler.

Both of these options involve implementing a function with the event message as an input and a Boolean value as a return value.

Here is an example of a GPAL Event Handler definition where event.userName is used to gain access to the user who triggered the event; if the user name is not system.user, it is directed to an approval procedure:

eventHandler {
eventHandler<Company>("COMPANY_INSERT") {
// Override requiresPendingApproval here to enable the "pending approval" flow.
// In this implementation, any user that is not "system.user" needs to go through the approval mechanism.
// The last line just needs to evaluate to a boolean; if false it does not require approval, if true it does
requiresPendingApproval { event ->
event.userName != "system.user"
}
onCommit { event ->
val company = event.details
// custom code block..
ack()
}
}
}

or in a custom Event Handler definition:

package global.genesis.position.samples.events.async

import global.genesis.commons.annotation.Module
import global.genesis.eventhandler.typed.async.AsyncContextValidatingEventHandler
import global.genesis.gen.dao.Company
import global.genesis.message.core.event.Event
import global.genesis.message.core.event.EventReply
import global.genesis.message.core.event.ValidationResult

@Module
class TestCompanyHandlerAsyncContext : AsyncContextValidatingEventHandler<Company, EventReply, String> {
override suspend fun onValidate(message: Event<Company>): ValidationResult<EventReply, String> {
val company = message.details
// custom code block..
val companyName = company.companyName
return validationResult(ack(), companyName)
}

override suspend fun onCommit(message: Event<Company>, context: String?): EventReply {
if(context != null){
// Do something with the context
}
val company = message.details
// custom code block..
return ack()
}
}

Pending approval workflow

Events going through a pending approval workflow are validated as usual (i.e. the onValidate method is run). If the validation is successful, the “delayed” event is stored in the APPROVAL table in JSON format.

Assuming the event is inserting, updating or deleting a target database record, it is possible to have multiple APPROVAL records associated with a single database entity. So, you should use the event onValidate method to check for pre-existing approvals against the entities related to the event if you need to ensure there is only one pending approval per record.

The APPROVAL record is keyed on an auto-generated APPROVAL_ID and does not have a direct link to the original record(s). You have to create one or many links by adding “approval entity” details to the payload returned within an approvableAck inside the onValidate method. These details include the entityTable (e.g COUNTERPARTY), entityKey (e.g. COUNTERPARTY_ID), as well as an optional approvalType to describe what operation is happening on the entity itself (e.g. NEW, UPDATE or REMOVE).

This approach enables you to decide how to identify the original record (e.g. creating a compound key in the case of multi-field keys). When the approval entity details are provided, the platform creates one or several records in the APPROVAL_ENTITY table; it populates it (them) with the details provided and the APPROVAL_ID of the APPROVAL record. There is also an APPROVAL_ENTITY_COUNTER, which is populated by the GENESIS_AUTH_CONSOLIDATOR process by default; this can be handy when you need to know how many approvals are pending for a given entity.

There are other useful properties you can set as part of the approvableAck definition. They are all optional and are detailed below:

  • entityDetails is a list of ApprovalEntityDetails with their corresponding entityTable, entityId and approvalType properties (see previous paragraph). By default, this list is empty.
  • approvalMessage contains the text that is sent back to the client, assuming the event is successfully submitted for approval. The default is "Your request was successful and has been submitted for approval".
  • additionalDetails can provide context information that is only available from a server-side perspective. This information complements the APPROVAL_MESSAGE content provided by the front end.
  • approvalType is used to state the action that happens when this event is approved: NEW for insertions, UPDATE for amends, REMOVE for removals. If undefined, this defaults to UNKNOWN). Most events will be simple, but of course some could affect multiple entities in different ways, which is why the entityDetails parameter can contain many entities, each with their own approvalType.

One further property, approvableAck, can be used in both custom EventHandler definitions and GPAL Event Handlers. Here is an example of approvableAck in action for a GPAL Event Handler onValidate block below.

eventHandler {
eventHandler<Company>("COMPANY_AMEND") {
// Override requiresPendingApproval here to enable the "pending approval" flow.
// In this implementation, any user that is not "system.user" needs to go through requires going through the approval mechanism.
// The last line just needs to evaluate to a boolean; if false it does not require approval, if true it does
requiresPendingApproval { event ->
event.userName != "system.user"
}
onValidate { event ->
val company = event.details
// custom validation code block..
return approvableAck(
entityDetails = listOf(
// One or many entities can be affected with a single event, so we can provide the whole list here
ApprovalEntityDetails(
entityTable = "COMPANY",
entityId = event.details.companyId.toString(),
approvalType = ApprovalType.UPDATE
)
),
approvalMessage = "Company update for ${event.details.companyId} has been sent for approval.",
approvalType = ApprovalType.UPDATE,
additionalDetails = "Sensitive update, tread carefully"
)
}
onCommit { event ->
val company = event.details
// custom code block..
ack()
}
}
}

The platform provides two Data Server queries that contain Pending approval information: ALL_APPROVAL_ALERTS and ALL_APPROVAL_ALERTS_AUDITS

Example APPROVAL DB record

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TIMESTAMP 2023-02-27 15:33:42.364(n:0,s:1019) NANO_TIMESTAMP
ACTIONED_BY JaneDee STRING
APPROVAL_ID fdef7802-6bd1-4c51-a232-6a4bc2325598A... STRING
APPROVAL_KEY fac1be9f-1653-4ecf-9050-d13cc2d2cdb4A... STRING
APPROVAL_MESSAGE Cancelled STRING
APPROVAL_REQUESTED_AT 2023-02-27 15:33:38.450 +0000 DATETIME
APPROVAL_STATUS CANCELLED ENUM[PENDING APPROVED CANCELLED REJECTED_BY_USER REJECTED_BY_SERVICE]
APPROVAL_TYPE REMOVE ENUM[NEW UPDATE REMOVE UNKNOWN]
DESTINATION COUNTERPARTY_EVENT_HANDLER STRING
EVENT_DETAILS ISSUER_ID = 3 STRING
EVENT_MESSAGE {"DETAILS":{"COUNTERPARTY_ID":3},"MES... STRING
MESSAGE_TYPE EVENT_COUNTERPARTY_DELETE STRING
USER_NAME JaneDee STRING
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Example APPROVAL_ENTITY record

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TIMESTAMP 2023-02-27 15:33:38.459(n:0,s:1004) NANO_TIMESTAMP
APPROVAL_ID fdef7802-6bd1-4c51-a232-6a4bc2325598A... STRING
APPROVAL_TYPE REMOVE ENUM[NEW UPDATE REMOVE UNKNOWN]
ENTITY_ID 3 STRING
ENTITY_TABLE COUNTERPARTY STRING
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Available pending approval events

Once in the APPROVAL table, the pending event can be cancelled, rejected or accepted by sending the following event messages to GENESIS_CLUSTER:

  • EVENT_PENDING_APPROVAL_ACCEPT
  • EVENT_PENDING_APPROVAL_CANCEL
  • EVENT_PENDING_APPROVAL_REJECT

All messages require a valid APPROVAL_ID and APPROVAL_MESSAGE in their metadata.

Configuring allowed approvers: basic

The platform ensures that users cannot approve or reject their own events, but they can cancel them. To complement this, users that have not created a specific pending approval event can only accept or reject, not cancel.

Additional levels of control (e.g. based on user groups) can be added at three points:

  • to the front end
  • to the event onValidate method
  • specified in the server-side configuration

To configure the allowed approvers using server-side configuration:

  1. Create a new GPAL approval file; its name must end in -approval.kts (e.g. test-approval.kts).

  2. Add the file name to the GENESIS_CLUSTER <script></script> element in the site-specific version of the genesis-processes.xml. See the sample file below:

import global.genesis.session.RightSummaryCache

val rightSummaryCache = inject<RightSummaryCache>()

pendingApproval {
insert {
true
}

accept {
val userAttributes = entityDb.get(UserAttributes.byName(userName))
userAttributes?.accessType == AccessType.INTERNAL
}

cancel {
true
}

reject {
rightSummaryCache.userHasRight(userName, "REJECT_PENDING_APPROVAL")
}
}

You can replace the "true" return values with Kotlin code in each of the relevant blocks, or not define them at all, as they will return "true" by default.

The platform makes the following objects accessible to the insert block:

  • insertMessage - an instance of the PendingApprovalInsert class, which is used to populate the APPROVAL table if successful. The content of this class consists of several properties:
    • approvalMessage - contains the original approval message text sent by the user who initiated the action.
    • messageType - represents the original EVENT name (e.g. EVENT_TRADE_INSERT).
    • destination - is the process name this event was originally targeting (e.g. POSITION_EVENT_HANDLER).
    • eventMessage - contains the JSON object representing the original message payload.
    • approvalType - equivalent to the property with the same name provided as part of approvableAck (see earlier section).
    • additionalDetails - equivalent to the property with the same name provided as part of approvableAck (see earlier section).
    • generated - equivalent to the property named entityDetails provided as part of approvableAck (see earlier section).
  • userName - a string property containing the user name who triggered the event.
  • messageType - a shortcut property accessor for the messageType value stored inside insertMessage.
  • eventMessage - a shortcut property accessor for the eventMessage value stored inside insertMessage.

The following objects are accessible within the accept, cancel and reject blocks:

  • userName - a string property containing the user name who triggered the pending approval event (e.g. accept, reject or cancel).
  • pendingApproval - the pending approval record stored in the database. The type of this property is the "Approval" database entity (see table entities).
  • approvalMessage - an instance of the ApprovalMessage class, which represents the payload of the message sent to EVENT_PENDING_APPROVAL_ACCEPT, EVENT_PENDING_APPROVAL_CANCEL and EVENT_PENDING_APPROVAL_REJECT. It contains two properties:
    • approvalMessage - the message text sent by the user who initiated this pending approval action
    • approvalId - contains the APPROVAL_ID used to identify the APPROVAL record we are handling as part of this action
  • messageType - a shortcut property accessor for the messageType value stored inside pendingApproval.
  • eventMessage - a shortcut property accessor for the eventMessage value stored inside pendingApproval.

The following properties are automatically available for the whole scope of the -approval.kts file:

val systemDefinition: SystemDefinitionService
val rxDb: RxDb
val entityDb: AsyncEntityDb
val evaluatorPool: EvaluatorPool
val networkConfiguration: NetworkConfiguration
val serviceDetailProvider: ServiceDetailProvider
val serviceDiscovery: ServiceDiscovery
val injector: Injector

As shown in the previous code example, you can perform database lookups to retrieve additional information and return true only if the necessary rights or attributes are in place. For example, if your system has the concept of internal and external users, and you only want to allow internal users to accept pending events, then you could check your custom user "ACCESS_TYPE" field as follows:

pendingApproval {
accept {
val userAttributes = entityDb.get(UserAttributes.byName(userName))
userAttributes?.accessType == AccessType.INTERNAL
}
}

Configuring allowed approvers: advanced

You might have noticed that the original type-safe event message types are lost inside the -approval.kts file, as the content of eventMessage inside APPROVAL table (and also inside PendingApprovalInsert) is a serialised JSON string. You can deserialise the original type-safe objects using the selectPredicate method combined with multiple onEvent predicates. These methods are available in all the pendingApproval code blocks: insert, accept, cancel and reject.

  • selectPredicate is a function that accepts an indeterminate number of functions returning a boolean value, as well as a mandatory default function to handle messages that do not fall into any defined category. The default function provides a GenesisSet object with the contents of the original message payload.
  • onEvent works very similarly to any other GPAL Event Handler definition. It enables you to treat the incoming message in the same way as you would have done within the original Event Handler; however, each function must return a boolean expression.

Please see the example below for custom logic using a table called "RESTRICTED_SYMBOL" to prevent restricted symbols from being added to the system, as well as checking user right codes:

import global.genesis.session.RightSummaryCache

val rightSummaryCache = inject<RightSummaryCache>()

pendingApproval {
accept {
selectPredicate(
onEvent<TradeInsert>("TRADE_INSERT") { event ->
val tradeInsert = event.details
val stockInRestrictedList = entityDb.get(RestrictedSymbol.bySymbol(tradeInsert.symbol))
// Deny any operation on restricted symbols.
if (stockInRestrictedList != null) {
false
} else {
rightSummaryCache.userHasRight(userName, "TRADE_INSERT")
}
},
onEvent<TradeAmend>("TRADE_AMEND") { event ->
val tradeAmend = event.details
val stockInRestrictedList = entityDb.get(RestrictedSymbol.bySymbol(tradeAmend.symbol))
// Deny any operation on restricted symbols.
if (stockInRestrictedList != null) {
false
} else {
rightSummaryCache.userHasRight(userName, "TRADE_AMEND")
}
},
onEvent<TradeDelete>("TRADE_DELETE") { event ->
val tradeDelete = event.details
val stockInRestrictedList = entityDb.get(RestrictedSymbol.bySymbol(tradeDelete.symbol))
// Deny any operation on restricted symbols.
if (stockInRestrictedList != null) {
false
} else {
rightSummaryCache.userHasRight(userName, "TRADE_DELETE")
}
},
// If the message can't be deserialized we will use a default fallback to genesisSet.
default = { genesisSet ->
true
}
)
}
}

System rejects

An approval process deliberately delays events. So it is possible that by the time a pending approval action is approved, the underlying data has changed enough to cause the delayed event to fail when executed. When this happens, the pending approval record will be marked as REJECTED_BY_SYSTEM in its APPROVAL_STATUS field.

The platform provides an event designed to help you to reject events directly from the back end without human intervention. "EVENT_PENDING_APPROVAL_SYSTEM_REJECT" is an event that can be used to satisfy any specific requirements that fall outside the functionality of the pending approval system. The event is only accessible by back-end services. It takes two parameters:

  • approvalMessage is the text of the message to be sent when the message is rejected.
  • approvalKey is a unique identifier for each pending approval record. This identifier is never exposed to the front end, so only back-end services have access to it. That makes it impossible to trigger this event unless you have access to the database system. You need to obtain the approvalKey programatically so that you can supply it as a parameter value.

Let us look at an example. Consider a solution that needs to submit trades to an external system every day at midnight for confirmation purposes. Once the trades have been submitted, their content cannot be changed anymore, unless a separate amendment process is started outside the Genesis application. The system has a pending approval system that enables users to amend the content of each "Trade" database record to provide extra security.

Once a "Trade" record has been submitted at midnight, you need to prevent any pending approval events from amending the content of the trade records in the system, as this could cause inconsistencies between the external system and the Genesis system. To prevent this, you could run a job that automatically rejects all pending approval records at midnight every day.

Here is an example GPAL script that could be run every day at midnight to reject all the pending records.

import global.genesis.clustersupport.service.ServiceDiscovery
import global.genesis.message.core.event.ApprovalSystemRejectMessage
import global.genesis.message.core.event.Event
import global.genesis.pal.shared.inject
import kotlin.system.exitProcess

val serviceDiscovery: ServiceDiscovery = injector.inject()
val client = serviceDiscovery.resolveClientByResource("EVENT_PENDING_APPROVAL_SYSTEM_REJECT")
if (client == null || !client.isConnected) {
println("Unable to find service exposing EVENT_PENDING_APPROVAL_SYSTEM_REJECT")
exitProcess(1)
} else {
suspendable {
entityDb.getBulk<Approval>()
.filter { it.approvalStatus == ApprovalStatus.PENDING }
.collect { approval ->
val reply: EventReply? = client.suspendRequest(
Event(
messageType = "EVENT_PENDING_APPROVAL_SYSTEM_REJECT",
userName = "SYSTEM",
details = ApprovalSystemRejectMessage(
approvalKey = approval.approvalKey,
approvalMessage = "Rejected by system"
)
)
)
when (reply) {
is EventReply.EventAck ->
println("Successfully rejected APPROVAL_ID: $&#123;approval.approvalId}")
is EventReply.EventNack ->
println("Failed to rejected APPROVAL_ID: $&#123;approval.approvalId}: $reply")
else ->
println("Unexpected response from pending approval system: $reply")
}
}
}
}

Defining an Event Handler in GPAL

In most cases, you will create Event Handlers in a kts file using GPAL. This offers a method with succinct code and a good degree of flexibility.

However, you can also implement Event Handlers as a set of classes. Typically, this is useful where you have a complex requirement for business logic and database interaction. For example, a kts file of 1,000 lines is difficult to test and maintain; in this case, a set of individual classes is much more convenient.

For implementing an Event Handler as a set of classes, there are three different options:

  • Async. This uses the Kotlin coroutine API to simplify asynchronous development. This is the underlying implementation used in GPAL Event Handlers. You can only create Async Event Handlers using Kotlin.
  • RxJava3. This uses the RxJava3 library, which is a popular option for composing asynchronous event-based programs. You can create RxJava3 Event Handlers using either Kotlin or Java.
  • Sync. This creates synchronous Event Handlers. You can create Sync Event Handlers using either Kotlin or Java.
note

Java Event Handlers can be implemented using RxJava3 and Sync Event Handlers only. Async Event Handlers cannot be used, as there is no implementation for Kotlin coroutines in Java.

We recommend using Kotlin to implement Event Handlers.

If you would like to know more about creating an event handler in GPAL, please visit our event-handler-api page.

Available properties

The following properties are automatically available inside GPAL Event Handlers:

val systemDefinition: SystemDefinitionService
val rxDb: RxDb
val entityDb: AsyncEntityDb
val metaData: MetaDataRegistry
val evaluatorPool: EvaluatorPool
val messageDelegator: MessageDelegator
val networkConfiguration: NetworkConfiguration
val serviceDetailProvider: ServiceDetailProvider
val genesisHFT: GenesisHFT
val injector: Injector
val clientConnectionsManager: ClientConnectionsManager
val typedEventManager: TypedEventManager